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hops info

February 3, 2010 Leave a comment

this has varieties and some growth infohttp://www.hopunion.com/hopunion-variety-databook.pdf

.

http://www.byo.com/resources/hops

http://www.franklinbrew.org/brewinfo/hopschar.html

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/101/hops

http://everything2.com/title/Homebrewing+202%253A+Hop+Selection+and+Use

http://oldsite.midwestsupplies.com/products/hop_chart.asp

http://www.uvm.edu/~pass/perry/hopvars.html

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Categories: hops, ingredients

Grain Characteristics

January 30, 2010 Leave a comment
Categories: ingredients

using sugar

December 12, 2009 Leave a comment

http://www.brewlikeamonk.com/?p=88 says

To boost alcohol, fermentability, and produce what Belgians refer to as a “more digestible” beer, plain sucrose―the stuff you can buy at your local grocery store―works just as well as clear candi sugar (rocks). The dark, rummy character that comes from caramelized sugar is harder to duplicate, and certainly not by using American brown sugar.

and http://madfermentationist.blogspot.com/2007/10/homemade-candi-syrup.html says how to carmelize sugar to make candi sugar.

and from http://www.fermentarium.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=238&Itemid=58

Sucrose is just a sugar disaccharide made of two monosaccharides called fructose and glucose.

Belgian candi is sugar.  There is a slight difference though.  Belgian candi is fructose and glucose.  Table sugar is sucrose.  The reason for the difference is Belgian candi has been inverted.  Inverted sugar is produced by splitting sucrose into fructose and glucose.  Yeast has a field day with fructose and glucose, but struggles a bit with sucrose.  To break down sucrose, the yeast must first produce an invertase enzyme.  It’s an extra step for the yeast, but the yeast (and most organisms) can do it.

Some people report the enzyme produced by the yeast can give the beer an off flavor.  Just to be safe, it would be better if you can first break your table sugar down into the monosaccharides.  To break down the sucrose, you can use an enzyme (from the yeast in your wort), or you can use acid and heat.

Categories: ingredients

Bottling Sugar Required

December 5, 2009 Leave a comment

Use 2/3 cup white sugar for 5 gallons.

That’s just 10.66 tablespoons.

2 Tablespoons per gallon plus a smidge.

Gruit

November 10, 2009 Leave a comment
Categories: gruit, history, ingredients

Ingredients

November 5, 2009 Leave a comment
Categories: ingredients, organics